Archive | medical RSS for this section

Radiology: Top 5 Radiopaedia articles for medical…

Radiology: Top 5 Radiopaedia articles for medical students

  1. Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction – learn how to identify the early signs of an MCA infarct on CT.
  2. Appendicitis – learn how to diagnose this important surgical emergency with both CT and ultrasound.
  3. Extradural Haemorrhage – learn the classic appearance of an extradural haematoma and the simple rules that can help distinguish it from subdural blood.
  4. Acute Cholecystitis – learn the typical ultrasound and CT features of cholecystitis and how to identify gallstones. 
  5. Lobar Collapse – learn how to recognise the 5 different types of pulmonary lobar collapse, an essential skill for any clinician.  

from our tumblr blog

http://radiologysigns.tumblr.com/

Last year’s april fool case created quite a buzz! What…

Last year’s april fool case created quite a buzz! What will the Radiopaedia team come up with this year?

from our tumblr blog

http://radiologysigns.tumblr.com/

Q: What name is given to this mandible fracture pattern which…

Q: What name is given to this mandible fracture pattern which also included a symphysis fracture? ANSWER: http://goo.gl/vSoRj

from our tumblr blog

http://radiologysigns.tumblr.com/

SALTR – a useful memonic to help remember the five types…

SALTR – a useful memonic to help remember the five types of growth plate fracture (Salter-Harris classification). Fortunately the order also directly relates to prognosis from best to worse.

  • S – slipped = type I
  • A – above = type II
  • L – lower = type III
  • T – through or transverse or together = type IV
  • R – ruined or rammed = type V

from our tumblr blog

http://radiologysigns.tumblr.com/

Emergency Medicine Ireland

Emergency Medicine Ireland: While we are a tumblr-centric blog, occasionally our content breaks free…
from our tumblr blog

http://radiologysigns.tumblr.com/

QUIZ: Six elbows from six different patients. Can you identify…

QUIZ: Six elbows from six different patients. Can you identify which of them have joint effusions? Click for ANSWER

from our tumblr blog

http://radiologysigns.tumblr.com/

Scotty dog sign – refers to the normal appearance of the lumbar…

Scotty dog sign – refers to the normal appearance of the lumbar spine posterior elements when seen on oblique views:

  • the transverse process being the nose
  • the pedicle forming the eye
  • the inferior articular facet being the front leg
  • the superior articular facet representing the ear
  • the pars interarticularis (the lamina between the facets) equivalent to the neck.

If a spondylolysis is present, the pars interarticularis will have a defect and look like the Scotty dog has a collar – or doggy decapitation for those with a bloodier imagination!

from our tumblr blog

http://radiologysigns.tumblr.com/

QUIZ: 12yo boy who fell whilst playing football. Can you spot…

QUIZ: 12yo boy who fell whilst playing football. Can you spot the important injury? Click for ANSWER.

HINT: Our CRITOE post from a few weeks ago may come in handy. Skip video to 3:32 for discussion of this specific case.

from our tumblr blog

http://radiologysigns.tumblr.com/

Lobar haemorrhage – an intracerebral bleed (haemorrhagic stroke)…

Lobar haemorrhage – an intracerebral bleed (haemorrhagic stroke) that occurs superficially within the cerebral lobes. In contrast to hypertensive haemorrhages which occur deep within the brain, primary lobar haemorrhages occur superficially due to cerebral amyloid angiopathy. They typically occur in elderly patients and as with any haemorrhage, it is important to consider the possibility of an underlying tumour or vascular malformation. 

This short video tutorial is courtesy of Dr Frank Gaillard and the Radiology Channel.

from our tumblr blog

http://radiologysigns.tumblr.com/