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Volume rendered CT of a patient with severe rotoscoliosis and…

Volume rendered CT of a patient with severe rotoscoliosis and gibbus deformity

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QUIZ: 12yo boy who fell whilst playing football. Can you spot…

QUIZ: 12yo boy who fell whilst playing football. Can you spot the important injury? Click for ANSWER.

HINT: Our CRITOE post from a few weeks ago may come in handy. Skip video to 3:32 for discussion of this specific case.

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Lobar haemorrhage – an intracerebral bleed (haemorrhagic stroke)…

Lobar haemorrhage – an intracerebral bleed (haemorrhagic stroke) that occurs superficially within the cerebral lobes. In contrast to hypertensive haemorrhages which occur deep within the brain, primary lobar haemorrhages occur superficially due to cerebral amyloid angiopathy. They typically occur in elderly patients and as with any haemorrhage, it is important to consider the possibility of an underlying tumour or vascular malformation. 

This short video tutorial is courtesy of Dr Frank Gaillard and the Radiology Channel.

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QUIZ CASE: 40yo male with abdominal pain and vomiting. Click…

QUIZ CASE: 40yo male with abdominal pain and vomiting. Click here to ENTER QUIZ MODE where there are axial and coronal image stacks to scroll through, 4 study questions and 3 annotated images. HINT: Not appendicitis! This previous blog post may also be helpful 🙂

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MAGIC DR – a handy mnemonic used to remember…

MAGIC DR – a handy mnemonic used to remember the potential causes of a cerebral ring enhancing lesion.

M – Metastasis

A – Abscess

G – Glioblastoma multiforme

I – Infarct (subacute phase)

C – Contusion

D – Demyelinating disease (eg. tumefactive MS)

R – Radiation necrosis

An alternative is DR MAGIC of course, which is what you may like to call yourself if you can remember the list! Although you can’t possibly know by looking at the single images, for what it is worth, the above cases are; A = metastasis, B = abscess, C = radiation necrosis, D = GBM, E = demyelination, F = contusion.

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Hypertensive haemorrhage – high blood pressure is the most…

Hypertensive haemorrhage – high blood pressure is the most common cause of primary intracerebral haemorrhage (also known as haemorrhagic stroke). Typical locations include:

This short educational video comes to you courtesy of Dr Frank Gaillard and the RadiologyChannel.

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Caput medusae – a clinical and radiological sign seen in…

Caput medusae – a clinical and radiological sign seen in severe portal hypertension. It describes distended and engorged paraumbilical veins radiating from the umbilicus across the abdominal wall to join systemic veins creating portal-systemic anastomoses. The appearance is reminiscent of Medusa, a gorgon of Greek mythology, who was encountered and defeated by Perseus. Pictured is ‘Medusa’ by Caravaggio painted in 1595.  

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