Tag Archive | basic

SALTR – a useful memonic to help remember the five types…

SALTR – a useful memonic to help remember the five types of growth plate fracture (Salter-Harris classification). Fortunately the order also directly relates to prognosis from best to worse.

  • S – slipped = type I
  • A – above = type II
  • L – lower = type III
  • T – through or transverse or together = type IV
  • R – ruined or rammed = type V

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Scotty dog sign – refers to the normal appearance of the lumbar…

Scotty dog sign – refers to the normal appearance of the lumbar spine posterior elements when seen on oblique views:

  • the transverse process being the nose
  • the pedicle forming the eye
  • the inferior articular facet being the front leg
  • the superior articular facet representing the ear
  • the pars interarticularis (the lamina between the facets) equivalent to the neck.

If a spondylolysis is present, the pars interarticularis will have a defect and look like the Scotty dog has a collar – or doggy decapitation for those with a bloodier imagination!

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Lobar haemorrhage – an intracerebral bleed (haemorrhagic stroke)…

Lobar haemorrhage – an intracerebral bleed (haemorrhagic stroke) that occurs superficially within the cerebral lobes. In contrast to hypertensive haemorrhages which occur deep within the brain, primary lobar haemorrhages occur superficially due to cerebral amyloid angiopathy. They typically occur in elderly patients and as with any haemorrhage, it is important to consider the possibility of an underlying tumour or vascular malformation. 

This short video tutorial is courtesy of Dr Frank Gaillard and the Radiology Channel.

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QUIZ CASE: 40yo male with abdominal pain and vomiting. Click…

QUIZ CASE: 40yo male with abdominal pain and vomiting. Click here to ENTER QUIZ MODE where there are axial and coronal image stacks to scroll through, 4 study questions and 3 annotated images. HINT: Not appendicitis! This previous blog post may also be helpful 🙂

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MAGIC DR – a handy mnemonic used to remember…

MAGIC DR – a handy mnemonic used to remember the potential causes of a cerebral ring enhancing lesion.

M – Metastasis

A – Abscess

G – Glioblastoma multiforme

I – Infarct (subacute phase)

C – Contusion

D – Demyelinating disease (eg. tumefactive MS)

R – Radiation necrosis

An alternative is DR MAGIC of course, which is what you may like to call yourself if you can remember the list! Although you can’t possibly know by looking at the single images, for what it is worth, the above cases are; A = metastasis, B = abscess, C = radiation necrosis, D = GBM, E = demyelination, F = contusion.

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Hypertensive haemorrhage – high blood pressure is the most…

Hypertensive haemorrhage – high blood pressure is the most common cause of primary intracerebral haemorrhage (also known as haemorrhagic stroke). Typical locations include:

This short educational video comes to you courtesy of Dr Frank Gaillard and the RadiologyChannel.

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Caput medusae – a clinical and radiological sign seen in…

Caput medusae – a clinical and radiological sign seen in severe portal hypertension. It describes distended and engorged paraumbilical veins radiating from the umbilicus across the abdominal wall to join systemic veins creating portal-systemic anastomoses. The appearance is reminiscent of Medusa, a gorgon of Greek mythology, who was encountered and defeated by Perseus. Pictured is ‘Medusa’ by Caravaggio painted in 1595.  

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Leontiasis ossea – a largely historical term used to describe a…


Photo credit: Vincenzo Gianferrari Pini License: This file is licensed under the Creative Commons “Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 Italy”

Leontiasis ossea – a largely historical term used to describe a number of conditions which result in the affected patient’s face resembling that of a lion. Although it is most frequently the result of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia (as in this case), the term has a broader usage encompassing other expansile facial bone diseases such as Paget’s disease

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Holly leaf sign – refers to the typical chest radiograph…

Holly leaf sign – refers to the typical chest radiograph appearance of calcified pleural plaques. The well-defined but irregular thickened edges simulate the appearance of a holly leaf. ‘Geographic density’ is another common term used to describe their appearance. Pleural plaques are the most common form of asbestos related disease

A MERRY CHRISTMAS TO YOU ALL from the team at Radiopaedia.org

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CRITOE – the important mnemonic used to remember the names and…

CRITOE – the important mnemonic used to remember the names and order of appearance of the six elbow ossification centers. Elbow trauma is common in childhood and knowing CRITOE can be critical to detecting important pathology. This video tutorial includes two abnormal teaching cases which start at 3:31.

C – capitellum : 1 year

R – radial head : 3 years

I – internal (medial) epicondyle : 5 years

T – trochlea : 7 years

O – olecranon : 9 years

E – external (lateral) epicondyle : 11 years

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